Category Archives: Evangelization

Catholic Apologetics Bibliography–Out in Time for Lent!

My Catholic Apologetics Resources has been published by the Principium Institute, and is available in both Kindle for $2.99, and in Paperback for $6.99. It has come out just in time for Lent, for those interested in beefing up on their apologetics reading during Lent. The book is a lengthy bibliography, organized both topically and by reading level. Spanning 219 pages, this resources lists important sources on a variety of topics: baptism, communion of saints, confession, Crusades, Eucharist, existence of God, Inquisition, Jesus’ resurrection, Mary, papacy, purgatory, reformation, reliability of the New Testament, reliability of the Old Testament, and a number of other topics.

The Mission of Marriage

I once spoke to a teen that wanted to convert to Catholicism. I began by asking her a question, “What does it mean to be Catholic?” Thinking I was the wise teacher and eager to guide her in the faith, I was surprised that her answer would ultimately be a source of learning for myself. She responded, “What it means to be Catholic means to be more and more who we are, who we are called to be, and to be more human.” I wonder what it would mean to the girl if I asked what it means to be married? I surmise her answer might be, “To be married means to become more and more who they were created to be, namely, to be love.”

This is the mission of the married couple. Their mission is rooted and grounded in love, the love of God for them ultimately expressed through the sacrifice of Christ. This love that is given to them through their mere creation is expressed to the world through their mutual, total, life-giving love. They are to be a reflection of Christ’s love for His Church. “And since in God’s plan it has been established as an ‘intimate community of life and love,’ the family has the mission to become more and more what it is, that is to say, a community of life and love in an effort that will find fulfillment, as will everything created and redeemed, in the kingdom of God.”[1]

The Crises of Saints–Crisis Magazine

We don’t have to go very far to recognize that there are abundant crises in our world today. We find crises of various proportions in every corner of the globe and in virtually all sectors of society. Check the news online, read the various blogs, twitter feeds, social media, or turn on the radio or TV, and you are guaranteed to be inundated with crises of every sort: crises in the world, crises in the Church, crises in the culture. We don’t even have to turn to news outlets to discover contemporary crises, we find them in the families around us, and in our own families……..

Source: The Crises of Saints–Crisis Magazine

One Lesson from Fatima: Things are Never as Inevitable as They May Appear to Be

Our Lady of Fatima and the Three Children

I want to begin with a personal anecdote that is not directly related to Fatima. In the academic year of 1996-1997 a junior at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio was running for student president, thinking that he would be able to have the most impact for good on campus by exercising that position his senior year. As a prominent member of the student senate he played a prominent and very public (both on national radio and outside of the U.S.) role in a number of significant changes that took place on campus. Notwithstanding his valiant efforts, he lost the presidential race. Unsure what to do, he turned to an older friend and mentor, and decided to become an R.A. in a dorm and lead a Bible study for freshmen in the dorm. This incoming senior would-be R.A. and Bible study leader, was a student leader in a very large para-church (primarily evangelical Protestant Christian) organization on campus, which, at least for the following two years (if I’m not mistaken), represented the largest para-church organization on any college campus in the world at that time, boasting about 1,000 members at their weekly meeting. His mentor, who happened to be Roman Catholic, was a staff member with that organization (at one point full-time, but by this point, part-time on a volunteer basis). That summer they decided to fast and pray for the future Bible study which together they would co-lead. They studied Scripture and church history together that summer, and they prayed and fasted that the future study would bear fruit for the kingdom of God.

This is My Daily Bread

“Why Be Catholic?”

The Most Rev. Robert Carlson, now Archbishop of St. Louis, answered this question at a talk he gave at Central Michigan University in January of 2009.  His answer: “because of the Eucharist.”

Jesus is made present to us in the liturgy in many ways: through His word proclaimed; through His priests in His Sacraments; through two or three fellow believers gathered together; and most profoundly through the Sacrifice of His Body and Blood made present in the Holy Eucharist.  Yet, the Eucharistic presence surpasses the others.  Pope Paul VI said it this way: “This presence is called ‘real’ – by which is not intended to exclude the other types of presence as if they could not be ‘real’ too, but because it is presence in the fullest sense: that is to say, it is a substantial presence by which Christ, God and man, makes himself wholly and entirely present.” (CCC 1374Mysterium Fidei 39)

Rediscovering the Eucharist

Midway through my freshman year of college I experienced a profound conversion where I came to know Jesus as so personally present to me as to be next to me or ‘in me.’  I never knew such closeness to God before.  I came to know Christ so deeply while pursuing God in the Scriptures and asking Him to help me to believe in His Son (as I later discovered, He was pursuing me).

To Love Neighbor, Find Neighbor

As Christians we are called to “love our neighbor as yourself.” (Mark 12:28-31)  Too often, however, as we become more and more engaged with our faith and the community where we worship, our neighbor tends to look more and more like us.  As humans, our tendency is to hang out with those who share our passions, worldview, and goals for life.  Our small group interactions are with Christians like ourselves and before we know it all our friends are Christians.  We fill our time with activites that are faith based narrowing our network to those that agree with us and our worldview. 

And the irony is that for those that take their faith seriously and that of their surrounding network they have a desire to live out the Great Commission (Matthew 28:16-20), but they have no immediate network to actively do so outside of “cold calling.”  To be a Great Commission people, we need to expand our network of friends and associates beyond our Christian ones.  To do so demands an intentional effort on our part to make friends beyond our inner circle.  How do we do this?  We do this by getting involved in activities (not sinful) that enable us to meet new people and expand our sphere of influence.  In secular terms this is called “networking.”  For the Christian, proper networking could have eternal significance. 

Measuring Successful Parish Ministry

measuringMy background is in theology and in nonprofit business/administration.  As such, I have sought ways to combine the best business practices within ministry.  And, with that in mind, I have wanted to “measure” what makes a successful parish.  What can we examine and evaulate to deem that a parish is doing well and another is not.  Or are we just to throw everything up to,  “We will see the fruits in heaven?”  There are many things we can analyze: offertory, mass attendance, number of baptisms and weddings, etc.  While these would give us some perspective into the success of the parish, I think that they can be attributed (good or bad) to other factors outside of the parishes control.  And, in some cases, I think these are additional by-products or secondary measurements caused by good catechesis and evangelization. 

The two measurable areas that I think one could use to gauge a successful parish are the  number of vocations to the priesthood and religious life and the size of ones Rite of Christian Initiation Program (R.C.I.A.). 

Evangelization: Let Us Define

shepherds hear gospelIn my two previous posts on evangelization, I focused on our need to both proclaim the gospel and to witness to it in our very lives.  I discussed its ontological nature, in that evangelization, goes to who the Church is as Church.  I also discussed that for evangelization to be effective in our world that real, true, and visible unity among God’s people is essential and I made an argument for ecumenism as a necessary means to evangelize. 

In this post, I thought it might be helpful to examine the word “evangelization” and what exactly it means.  Evangelization in its original Greek means to bring or announce good news, to preach or proclaim as glad tidings.  In its nonbiblical, Graeco-Roman usage it described the public proclamation of significant events such as an announcement of the Emperor Augustus’ birthday, “the birthday of the god [=emperor] was for the world the beginning of joyful tidings (evangelia) which have been proclaimed on his account.” 1  Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger [now Pope Benedict XVI] explores this meaning of “gospel” showing how it relates to the kingdom that Jesus ushers in: