Category Archives: Love & Truth

My New book on the Resurrection

Just in time for Easter, the Principium Institute has published my book on the historical evidence for Jesus’ resurrection, entitled, Jesus’ Resurrection: A Jewish Convert Examines the Evidence. It is available in both paperback as well as in Kindle. In this volume, I walk through the historical evidence that Jesus in fact rose from the dead. Much of this evidence was instrumental in my own conversion, but I update the volume in light of my more recent research since my conversion. The volume is intended for a popular audience, but it contains endnotes and bibliography for the interested scholar.

Here’s what others have to say:

Scott Hahn wrote:

“Dr. Jeffrey Morrow is a brilliant theologian whose work on the Resurrection provides abundant historical evidence for this greatest of biblical miracles. Highly recommended.”

Brant Pitre, the author of The Case for Jesus: The Biblical and Historical Evidence for Christ, wrote:

“As a convert to Christianity from Judaism, Jeffrey Morrow brings a unique perspective to the quest for Jesus. Even more, he leaves no stone unturned in the debate over what happened to Jesus’ body on the first Easter morning. Whether you are a skeptic or a believer, if you’re looking for a clear, concise, and compelling case for the Resurrection, then this is the book for you.”

On Biblical Scholarship and Bias.

Cover Three Skeptics and the BibleThe online magazine, The Bible and Interpretation, has recently published an article I wrote entitled, “On Biblical Scholarship and Bias.” The article has stirred up some controversy, even  eliciting a published response by Thomas L. Thompson, the famous biblical “minimalist” from the University of Copenhagen. The Bible and Interpretation intends to present articles written by biblical scholars that are more widely accessible to a broader audience outside the realm of specialist scholars. My article uses Joseph Ratzinger’s (Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI) 1988 Erasmus Lecture on “Biblical Interpretation in Crisis” as the starting point for the discussion. If you are interested in this debate, check out my Three Skeptics and the Bible.

On Mercy Late in Life and Contagious Holiness: St. John of God

st john of godA few days ago we celebrated the optional memorial of St. John of God. Our pastor gave a marvelous homily that day, which inspired this post. One of the key connection points the pastor made was the connection St. John of God had with other Saints with whom I was more familiar. To be quite honest, I knew next to nothing about St. John of God. So I began to investigate his life, and what an amazing man of God, St. John of God was! I thought his life–as well as his spiritual connection to other Saints–made this a very appropriate topic for a post during Lent….especially as we approach the end of Lent.

St. John of God is best known for his many followers who eventually founded the Hospitallers, a religious institution focused on aiding the sick, suffering, and dying, among other services they now provide. They are still in existence today.

What I didn’t know was St. John of God’s late conversion in life. In many ways he was a prodigal of the Church. A baptized Catholic, like virtually all his family and friends, he was a public sinner, who sinned in countless ways. He wasn’t just known for one particular sin, but many. He was a soldier, but was particularly known for leading a life best described as completely “wild.” He was around 40 years old, or so, when he had his conversion. He found mercy rather late in life.

Taking Stock Daily: The General Examination of Conscience

note takingOne of the most important but neglected spiritual practices is the daily general examination of conscience. No business would last very long without taking stock daily, calculating how much profit was made, etc., and there is no business more important than our soul. Socrates famously said that, “the unexamined life is not worth living.” We could say that an unexamined life is dangerous. It’s important to examine how we are doing fairly regularly in order to improve. When our goal is off in the distance, a little misdirection early in the journey–if it is not corrected–can spell disaster, landing us far off the mark.

Morrow’s New Book on the History of Modern Biblical Criticism

Cover Three Skeptics and the BibleMy latest book just came out, Three Skeptics and the Bible: La Peyrère, Hobbes, Spinoza, and the Reception of Modern Biblical Criticism, and is now available from Amazon.com for those interested. It details an important part of the history of modern biblical criticism, showing the political and historical developments that began to lead to a more skeptical treatment of biblical interpretation, like that found so often on t.v. today and in university classrooms across the globe. I’m currently working on a much broader work of the same topic, bringing it into the 20th century.